Welcome to Mrs. Waltz's Webpage
Here you will find information about my classes:

AP EUROPEAN HISTORY
PSYCHOLOGY
WORLD AFFAIRS

For homework assignments please refer to my calendar page.
AP European history assignments are posted in blue.
Psychology assignments are posted in orange.
World Affairs assignments are posted in green.

You can reach me via email at
waltz@mentorschools.org
or by phone at 440-974-5300
 
AP European History - On-line Resources and Further Reading
Europe in Retrospect

 

http://www.britannia.com/history/euro/index2.html

Flow Charts

 

http://www.flowofhistory.com/units/full

A History of Knowledge
History of Knowledge
A History of Knowledge is a book on intellectual history, with emphasis on the western civilization, written by Charles Van Doren, an editor of the Encyclopædia Britannica.Wikipedia

 The link below is to purchase the book.  It is available at the library

http://www.amazon.com/History-Knowledge-Past-Present-Future/dp/0345373162

Europe in Retrospect

Overview of the last 200 years of European History

http://britannia.com/history/euro/index2.html

Western Heritage on-line Resources

 Practice tests and review items from the textbook publisher

http://wps.prenhall.com/hss_kagan_westheritage_8/

Quizlet Test Prep

 

http://quizlet.com/5251529/ap-european-history-review-flash-cards/

Sparknotes Test Prep

 

http://testprep.sparknotes.com/testcenter/ap/eurohistory/

Youtube videos

 

http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLE6669C7979F339FF

Review Activities

 

http://www.studenthandouts.com/European-History.html
Psychology Welcome Page + On-line text Information

 Welcome to Psychology.  I hope you have a great year.

 
Understanding Psychology Access Code
 
To view the psychology text on-line please go to the following web address and enter the access code.  The book should appear. Some items to watch:
1. If the book cover does not appear, try to type in the access code instead of copying and pasting it.
2. An invalid access code notice may appear. Please wait a moment to see if the book cover appears 
3. Be sure to use the pull down menu on the left side of the screen to access the contents of the text.  Clicking on the text will not help. 
 
 If you have any problems with this code or any other issues you would like to discuss, please e-mail me at waltz@mentorschools.org.
 
Web address:   www.glencoe.com/ose
 
access code:  F8E0BEDFD7
 
 
 
Below is the syllabus for the course. 
 

INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY – SYLLABUS

Instructor: Mrs. Waltz

 

 

Content:      Psychology is a survey course designed to introduce students to the basic concepts of the discipline. The course topics are listed below:

 

1st Quarter Topics

2nd Quarter Topics

  • Introduction  (CH 1-2)                
  • Brain and Biology   (CH 6)
  • Consciousness/Dreams (CH 7)
  • Sensation/Perception  (CH 8)
  • Learning  (CH 9)
  • Memory   (CH 10)
  • Thinking/Problem Solving    (CH 11)
  • Motivation (CH 12)
  • Intelligence (CH 13)
  • Personality (CH 14)
  • Psychological Disorders  (CH 16)

 

 

 

Grading Policy:      The grade will consist of summative assessments and supports to learning. The summative assessments will be 80% of the grade. The supports to learning will be the remaining 20%. See the chart below for a more detailed explanation.  

 

Grade Distribution

80% (May include, but not limited to):

20% (May include, but not limited to):

Tests

Quizzes

Projects

Writing Assignments

Homework, includes items such as

  • Content standards related
  • Checked for accuracy

Class work checked for accuracy

Other summative work: includes portions of packets and psychological analyses

Participation, such as:

  • In-class work that supports standards
  • OGT support activities

Homework, includes items such as

  • Vocabulary
  • Review activities
  • Items checked for completion

Class work checked for completion

Binder/notebook checks

Content Standard Support Activities

 

 

 

Late policy and zeros:     Students may receive a zero for any assignment for the supports to learning (20% category)if it is not completed by the day it is due. For the summative assessments (80% category), it is expected that the students make every effort to be in class the day of the assessment. If the student is not present, it is expected that he/she make-up the assessment outside of class as soon as possible. If the student does not make-up the assessment by the end of the unit, the student may receive a zero for that assignment, but every effort will be made so that the student will complete the work in a timely manner. Late work is subject to up to 50% off during a unit of instruction (based on teacher discretion). No work will be accepted beyond the end of a unit of instruction (based on teacher discretion). Unexcused absences from class and academic dishonesty will result in disciplinary consequences and up to a 50% reduction in a student’s grade.

 

 

Homework & Quizzes:    Your homework will consist of reading assignments and small projects not completed in class. Your homework calendar indicates the date assignments are due. Reading assignments will be the subject of quizzes on the due date.

 

Tests: Students who are absent on the day of a test or absent the day before the test and choose not to take the test on test day will receive an alternate form of that test. Usually the alternate form will be an essay version.

 

Extra Credit: Opportunities for extra credit will be offered periodically throughout the grading period. All extra credit will relate to content topics.  The points will be placed in the 80% summative assessment category of grades.

 

Participation and Class Structure:Lessons will vary from day to day. There will be an emphasis on discussion and cooperative activities in the course. You are expected to participate in good faith. 

 

Behavior: Due to the sensitive nature of some topics in psychology, good behavior is expected and demanded from every student. You are expected to act like an adult and follow rules of common decency and respect. Every student is expected to respect opinions of others in the class. Every student is expected to use proper grammar, respectful language, and self-control. Discipline in psychology class follows the principles of operant conditioning. Other class rules must be observed including, but not limited to, the following:

 

  • BE ON TIME!!!! Tardy means you are not in the room when the bell rings. I reserve the right to assign consequences to tardy behavior.
  • NO SLEEPING IN CLASS!!!! If you should decide to sleep, you will be awakened and, perhaps, asked to stand in the back of the room. 
  • SNACKS ARE PERMITTEDwithin reason. You are expected to clean up after yourself or the privilege will be revoked.
  • PASS USE: if you need to use the restroom, you may use your hall pass. Please no loitering.
  • NO ELECTRONIC DEVICES ARE PERMITTED IN THE CLASSROOM: NO CELL PHONES, I-PODS, CALCULATORS, ETC. TEXTING IS NOT PERMITTED AT ANY TIME.
  • All purses and bags should be placed on the floor or on the back of your chair.
  • Push-up rule: Tossing trash into the garbage can and missing will result in the push-up penalty.

 

Attendance: Attendance is taken every day and checked against the school’s daily absent report. Follow the school’s procedures for excused absences. Check with me regarding missed work.

 

 

Supplies:    Bring the proper supplies for the class every day.

  • One folder/ notebook dedicated to psychology and can hold handouts
  • Your textbook
  • A pen or pencil

 

 

All school rules apply in the classroom, and rules may be adjusted as needed for each class.

 

PSYCHOLOGY – APA CONTENT STATEMENTS

 

Biopsychological Domain

Biological Bases of Behavior

After concluding this unit, students understand:

1. Structure and function of the nervous system in human and non-human animals

2. Structure and function of the endocrine system

3. The interaction between biological factors and experience

4. Methods and issues related to biological advances

 
Sensation and Perception

After concluding this unit, students understand:

1. The processes of sensation and perception

2. The capabilities and limitations of sensory processes

3. Interaction of the person and the environment in determining perception

 

Consciousness

After concluding this unit, students understand:

1. The relationship between conscious and unconscious processes

2. Characteristics of sleep and theories that explain why we sleep and dream

3. Categories of psychoactive drugs and their effects

4. Other states of consciousness

 

 

Development and Learning Domain

 
Life Span Development

After concluding this unit, students understand:

1. Methods and issues in life span development

2. Theories of life span development

3. Prenatal development and the newborn

4. Infancy (i.e., the first two years of life)

5. Childhood

6. Adolescence

7. Adulthood and aging

 

Learning

After concluding this unit, students understand:

1. Classical conditioning

2. Operant conditioning

3. Observational and cognitive learning

 

Language Development

After concluding this unit, students understand:

1. Structural features of language

2. Theories and developmental stages of language acquisition

3. Language and the brain

 

 

Cognition Domain

 
Memory

After concluding this unit, students understand:

1. Encoding of memory

2. Storage of memory

3. Retrieval of memory

 

Thinking

After concluding this unit, students understand:

1. Basic elements comprising thought

2. Obstacles related to thought

 

Intelligence

After concluding this unit, students understand:

1. Perspectives on intelligence

2. Assessment of intelligence

3. Issues in intelligence

 

 

Individual Variation Domain

 

Motivation

After concluding this unit, students understand:

1. Perspectives on motivation

2. Domains of motivated behavior in humans and non-human animals

 

Emotion

After concluding this unit, students understand:

1. Perspectives on emotion

2. Emotional interpretation and expression

3. Domains of emotional behavior

 

Personality

After concluding this unit, students understand:

1. Perspectives on personality 

2. Assessment of personality 

3. Issues in personality

 

Psychological Disorders

After concluding this unit, students understand:

1. Perspectives on abnormal behavior

2. Categories of psychological disorders

Psychology: 1st Quarter Project


1st QUARTER PROJECT – OPTION #1



SLEEP AND DREAM PROJECT





Goal: Analyze your sleep patterns, catalog your dreams, and reflect on the meaning of your dreams (if any).



Record and describe your pre-sleep routine. What are the steps you take every night before you go to sleep? Have you established a nightly routine? Or does your routine vary from night to night?
For 2 weeks, keep a log of your hours of sleep. Record the time you go to bed, the time you wake up, the number of times you awaken during the night. Note the quality of each night of sleep and how rested you feel in the morning.
Keep a dream journal. Refer to the handout regarding how to remember dreams for assistance in this effort. Each day, record in your journal your reflections of your dreams: were the dreams meaningless or nonsensical? Did the dreams have a deeper meaning or relate to something in your waking life?
At the end of two weeks, create a bar graph to depict the information in your log. This graph should depict number of hours slept each day, number of times awakened each night, and overall quality of sleep.
At the end of two weeks, review your dream journal and describe your theory on the meaning or lack of meaning in dreams. Be sure to discuss dreams in terms of psychological theory.
At the end of two weeks, write an analysis of your sleep habits. Consider the following questions and discuss in specific detail:

a. How effective is your pre-sleep routine? Do you fall asleep easily or is your routine counterproductive? Could you make changes?

b. Discuss the overall quality of sleep over the 2-week period. Reflect on the nature of your sleep patterns in the context of a teen’s natural circadian rhythms. Discuss any steps you might take to improve your quality of sleep.





Grading Rubric:



Pre-sleep routine record and description 10 points
Sleep log 15 points
Dream journal 15 points
Sleep chart 10 points
Reflection on the meaning of dreams 20 points
Analysis of sleep habits 20 points
Logistics/effort 10 points

Logs and journals handed in

Chart neat and easy to read

Reflections and analyses typed

Evidence of effort



TOTAL 100 POINTS



1st QUARTER PROJECT – OPTION #2



HAVE YOU BEEN CONDITIONED?







Goal: Identify and analyze the impact of classical conditioning in daily life.





Create a list of 20 habits or preferences that are part of your daily life. These habits could include daily routines in which you engage, such as a daily workout, or food preferences as well as dislikes.
For each of the 20 habits or preferences, discuss, in as much detail as possible, the story behind the preference. How did this habit become a part of your daily routine? You may need to consult a family member if you cannot remember some details.
Identify what type of learning that led to each behavior. Is it because of classical conditioning? Operant conditioning? Observational learning?
Once you have identified the type of learning that led to each behavior, describe the psychology behind it.
If you chose classical conditioning, identify and describe the unconditioned stimulus and response and the conditioned stimulus and response.
If you chose operant conditioning, identify and describe the reinforcement that was used. Was it positive reinforcement? Negative reinforcement? Punishment?
If you chose observational learning, describe the scenario that you observed and imitated.


This project can be completed in chart form or by using a template for each behavior. It does not have to be completed in paragraph form.



Grading rubric:


List of 20 habits and/preferences with background story for each 40 points
Identification of type of learning 20 points
Explanation for learning 40 points


TOTAL 100 POINTS

OPTION DECLARATION DAY/PROPOSAL DUE DATE: September 12, 2013
 
PROJECT DUE DATE: October 3, 2013
 
Welcome to the exciting course of World Affairs.  Below you will find the syllabus for the course.  Please refer to the webpage calendar for updates on class assignments.  This course does not have a textbook.  Resources will be provided by the teacher and from student investigation. I look forward to a great semester.
 

WORLD AFFAIRS – SYLLABUS

Instructor: Mrs. Waltz

 

Course Content Theme:   Thedynamicsofglobalinteractionsamongnations andregionspresentissuesthataffectallhumanity.Thesedynamicsinclude competing beliefsandgoals,methodsofengagement,andconflictandcooperation.Contemporaryissueshavepolitical,economic, social,historicandgeographiccomponents. Approachesto addressingglobalandregionalissuesreflecthistoricalinfluencesand multiple perspectives.

 

Course Topics and Content Statements:

  • Technology

o  Advances in communications technology have profound effects on the ability of governments, interest groups, individuals and the media to share information across national and cultural borders.

o  The development and use of technology influences economic, political, ethical and social issues.

o  Technologies inevitably involve trade-offs between costs and benefits. Decisions about the use of products and systems can result in intended and unintended consequences.

  • Sustainability

o  Decisions about human activities made by individuals and societies have implications for both current and future generations, including intended and unintended consequences.

o  Sustainability issues are interpreted and treated differently by people viewing them from various political, economic and cultural perspectives.

o  International associations and non-governmental organizations offer means of collaboration to address sustainability issues on local, national and international levels

  • Civil and Human Rights

o  Beliefs about civil and human rights vary among social and governmental systems.

o  Nations and international organizations pursue their own interests on issues related to civil and human rights, resulting in both conflict and cooperation particularly as it relates to injustices against minority groups.

o  Modern instances of genocide and ethnic cleansing present individual, organizational and national issues related to the responsibilities of participants and non-participants.

  • National Security and International Diplomacy

o  Nations seek to ensure the security of their geographic territories, political institutions, economic systems and ways of life. Maintaining security has political, social and economic costs.

o  Economic, political and social differences between global entities can lead to conflict unless mitigated through diplomacy or cooperative efforts.

o  Individuals and organizations work within, or outside of, established systems of power, authority and governance to influence their own security and the security of others.

 

Grading Policy:   The grade will consist of summative assessments, supports to learning, and analysis of current events. The distribution of grade percentages is as follows:

    • Summative assessments      = 60%
      • Includes projects, presentations, tests, role plays, etc.
    • Supports to learning              = 20%
      • Includes quizzes, simulation participation, video analysis
    • Current Events analysis         = 20%
      • Includes weekly assessment of a current event based on an assigned category

 

Late policy and zeros:  Students may receive a zero for any assignment for the supports to learning (20% category)if it is not completed by the day it is due. For the summative assessments (60% category), it is expected that the students make every effort to be in class the day of the assessment. If the student is not present, it is expected that he/she make-up the assessment outside of class as soon as possible. If the student does not make-up the assessment by the end of the unit, the student may receive a zero for that assignment, but every effort will be made so that the student will complete the work in a timely manner. Late work is subject to up to 50% off during a unit of instruction (based on teacher discretion). No work will be accepted beyond the end of a unit of instruction (based on teacher discretion). Unexcused absences from class and academic dishonesty will result in disciplinary consequences and up to a 50% reduction in a student’s grade.

 

Homework:  Your homework will consist of researching a current event article to present to the class on Friday of each week. In the event of a Friday absence, students will submit their current event article on their next day in class accompanied with a one-page summary and personal reaction to the current event. Additional homework may include class projects or assignments that were not completed during the class period.

 

Tests, Projects, and Simulations: The World Affairs course will have relatively few traditional tests. Quizzes may be given on smaller topics and will be announced ahead of time. Most assessments for this course will be in the form of projects and simulations. 

 

Extra Credit: Opportunities for extra credit will be offered periodically throughout the grading period. All extra credit will relate to content topics.  The points will be placed in the 60% summative assessment category of grades.

 

Participation and Class Structure:Lessons will vary from day to day. There will be an emphasis on cooperative activities in the course. You are expected to participate in good faith in class discussions, while viewing videos, and while participating in all class activities.

 

Behavior: You are expected to act like an adult and follow rules of common decency and respect. Every student is expected to respect opinions of others in the class. Every student is expected to use proper grammar, respectful language, and self-control. Other class rules must be observed including, but not limited to, the following:

  • BE ON TIME!!!! Tardy means you are not in the room when the bell rings. I reserve the right to assign consequences to tardy behavior.
  • NO SLEEPING IN CLASS!!!! If you should decide to sleep, you will be awakened and, perhaps, asked to stand in the back of the room. 
  • SNACKS ARE PERMITTEDwithin reason. You are expected to clean up after yourself or the privilege will be revoked.
  • PASS USE: if you need to use the restroom, you may use your hall pass. Please no loitering.
  • NO PERSONAL ELECTRONIC DEVICES ARE PERMITTED IN THE CLASSROOM: NO CELL PHONES, I-PODS, CALCULATORS, ETC. TEXTING IS NOT PERMITTED AT ANY TIME. If personal technology is to be utilized in a class project, strict usage guidelines will be observed.
  • Proper care and use of school computers MUST be observed!!
  • All purses and bags should be placed on the floor or on the back of your chair.
  • Push-up rule: Tossing trash into the garbage can and missing will result in the push-up penalty.

 

Attendance: Attendance is taken every day and checked against the school’s daily absent report. Follow the school’s procedures for excused absences. Check with me regarding missed work.

 

Supplies:      Bring the proper supplies for the class every day.

  • One folder/ notebook dedicated to psychology and can hold handouts
  • A pen or pencil

 

All school rules apply in the classroom, and rules may be adjusted as needed for each class.

Last Modified on 8/15/2013 10:47:29 AM
 
6451 Center Street   •   Mentor, Ohio 44060   •   Phone 440.255.4444   •   Fax 440.255.4622   •    Contact Us
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